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Ruscoe & moore v cryptopia ltd (in liquidation) [2022] nzhc 728

RUSCOE v CRYPTOPIA LTD (IN LIQUIDATION) [2020] NZHC 728 [8 April 2020] IN THE HIGH COURT OF NEW ZEALAND CIV-2019-409-000544 [2020] NZHC 728 BETWEEN DAVID IAN RUSCOE AND MALCOLM RUSSELL MOORE Applicants AND CRYPTOPIA LIMITED (IN LIQUIDATION) Defendant Hearing: Memoranda Filed: 11 - 14 February 2020 Introduction . Last week the High Court issued its decision in Ruscoe & Moore v Cryptopia Ltd (in liquidation) [2020] NZHC 728. The decision is notable, being the first of its kind in New Zealand to fully consider the proprietary consequences of cryptocurrency, and more specifically of digital assets David Ian Ruscoe & Malcolm Russell Moore v Cryptopia Limited (in liquidation) [2020] NZHC 718 (Cryptopia) 1 On 8 April 2020, the High Court of New Zealand issued a landmark judgment directly addressing the questions of whether. Introduction. In Ruscoe v Cryptopia Ltd (in Liquidation) [2020] NZHC 728 the New Zealand High Court held that cryptocurrencies, as digital assets, are a form of property that are capable of being held on trust.. The decision is important: as one of only a few currently in the common law world to address expressly the question, in a fully reasoned judgment, as to whether digital assets such as. Introduction. Last week the High Court issued its decision in Ruscoe & Moore v Cryptopia Ltd (in liquidation) [2020] NZHC 728.The decision is notable, being the first of its kind in New Zealand to.

Ruscoe v Cryptopia [2020] NZHC 728 By Emily Gillett, At the time of entering liquidation, Cryptopia still held cryptocurrencies valued at approximately NZD$170 million, leading to significant tension between Accordingly, in Ruscoe v Cryptopia Limited (in liq)[2020] NZHC 728 , the liquidators brought an application in the New Zealand. GROWING BODY OF COMMON LAW DECISIONS THAT CRYPTOCURRENCIES CAN AMOUNT TO PROPERTY: RUSCOE v CRYPTOPIA LIMITED (IN LIQUIDATION) CIV-2019-409-000544 [2020] NZHC 728. Categories. This post is part of the following categories: Uncategorized. May 18, 2020 GROWING BODY OF COMMON LAW DECISIONS THAT CRYPTOCURRENCIES CAN AMOUNT TO PROPERTY: RUSCOE v CRYPTOPIA LIMITED (IN LIQUIDATION) CIV-2019-409-000544 [2020] NZHC 728. Categories. This post is part of the following categories: Cyber security, Information security, IT and technology, Legislation

This article looks at the recent New Zealand High Court decision in Ruscoe & Moore v Cryptopia Limited 2020 (in liquidation) [2020] NZHC 728, alongside the curious Canadian tale of Quadriga CX (QCX) and considers what investors can do when faced with a crypto insolvency On 8 April 2020, Gendall J, sitting in the High Court of New Zealand, decided Ruscoe v Cryptopia Ltd (in liq), providing the most recent and authoritative common law statement in the world on whether a cryptocurrency is property. The case provides significant guidance for any jurisdiction, common or civil, faced with determining whether cryptocurrencies are property The facts of Ruscoe and Moore v Cryptopia Limited (In Liquidation) [2020] NZHC 728 might not be as racy as those of Quadriga, but nevertheless gave rise to novel questions.The High Court of New Zealand had to decide an interesting question about whether cryptocurrency traded on the exchange in question have the legal status of property On 8 April 2020, the New Zealand High Court in Ruscoe & Moore v Cryptopia Limited (in liquidation) [2020] NZHC 728 1 provided guidance concerning the categorisation and distribution of cryptocurrency assets in the liquidation of a company. Australian Courts have not yet examined cryptocurrencies in any detail, and certainly not in an insolvency context 2, so it is likely that this judgment. 24 Ruscoe & Moore v Cryptopia Limited (in liquidation) [2020] NZHC 728 25 Ruscoe & Moore v Cryptopia Limited (in liquidation) [2020] NZHC 728 26 National Provincial Bank v Ainsworth [1965] AC 1175 27 Ruscoe & Moore v Cryptopia Limited (in liquidation) [2020] NZHC 728

Vi skulle vilja visa dig en beskrivning här men webbplatsen du tittar på tillåter inte detta Background. The recent High Court of New Zealand decision of David Ian Ruscoe And Malcolm Russell Moore v Cryptopia Limited (in liquidation) [2020] NZHC 728 (8 April 2020) considered the very much unchartered waters of the legal standing of cryptocurrencies as property.. The decision is an interesting one because it is an example of the courts adapting existing legal concepts to new. Background. The recent High Court of New Zealand decision of David Ian Ruscoe And Malcolm Russell Moore v Cryptopia Limited (in liquidation) [2020] NZHC 728 (8 April 2020) considered the very much.

1400 WORDS USE HEADINGS BIBLIOGRAPHY CASES: Ruscoe and Moore v Cryptopia Ltd (In Liquidation) [2020] NZHC 728. Powell v Christensen [2006] QCA 197. B2C2 Ltd and Quoine Pte Ltd [2019] SGHC(I) 03. SECONDARY SOURCES: JOURNAL ARTICLE- Barbie Paul, 'Cryptocurrency as property: Ruscoe v. Cryptopia Ltd' (2020) 28(2) Australian Property Law Journal 106, 110.. The dispute in Ruscoe v Cryptopia Ltd (in Liquidation) [2020] NZHC 728 arose following the liquidation of Cryptopia, a cryptocurrency trading exchange. Cryptopia was placed into liquidation following a serious hack in 2019 and the loss of $30 million in cryptocurrency

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  1. ed cryptocurrencies in any detail, and certainly not in an insolvency context, so it is likely that this judgment will be.
  2. Cryptocurrencies as Property: Ruscoe and Moore v Cryptopia Limited (In Liquidation) [2020] NZHC 728 U. of Adelaide Law Research Paper No. 2020-33 Number of pages: 15 Posted: 22 Apr 2020
  3. OTC on Cryptoassets: a commentary on David Ian Ruscoe and Malcolm Russell Moore v Cryptopia Limited (in liquidation) [2020] NZHC 728 RICHARD HITCHCOCK QC, STEPHEN BUTLER AND CHLOË BELL 5 June 2020 . London Office Abu Dhabi Office Dubai Office The.

OTC's commercial team provide a commentary on David Ian Ruscoe and Malcolm Russell Moore v Cryptopia Limited. The judgment of the High Court of New Zealand in David Ian Ruscoe and Malcolm Russell Moore v Cryptopia Limited (in liquidation) [2020] NZHC 728 is the first fully reasoned judgment in the common law world on how cryptoassets should be characterised Thankfully, the New Zealand High Court in David Ian Ruscoe & Malcolm Russell Moore v Cryptopia Limited (in liquidation) [2020] NZHC 718 (Cryptopia), which deals directly with this issue. Brief Facts . Cryptopia is a cryptocurrency exchange online platform Ruscoe and Moore v. Cryptopia Limited (in liquidation) [2020] NZHC 728 (a New Zealand case) Cryptopia was a New Zealand-based cryptocurrency exchange that provided an online platform or exchange to allow users to trade pairs of cryptocurrencies between themselves, with Cryptopia charging fees for trades, deposits and withdrawals

Cryptocurrencies are property capable of being held on

David Ian Ruscoe and Malcom Russel Moore v Cryptopia Ltd (in liquidation) [2020] NZHC 728 4.38 David Lloyd & Co, re (1877) 6 Ch D 339 3.20 , 4.15 Davies, re (1867) LR 2 Ch App 808 4.10 Introduction Last week the High Court issued its decision in Ruscoe & Moore v Cryptopia Ltd (in liquidation) [2020] NZHC 728. The decision is notable, being the first of its kind in New Zealan... 16.04.2020 Posted in Regulator

Ruscoe v Cryptopia Limited (In Liquidation) [2020] NZHC 728 National Provincial Bank Ltd v Ainsworth [1965] AC 1175 (HL) at 1247-1248 Clayton v Clayton [Vaughan Road Property Trust] [2016] NZSC 2 Lessons from Ruscoe v Cryptopia Ltd Published on June 24, 2020 June 24, The dispute in Ruscoe v Cryptopia Ltd (in Liquidation) [2020] NZHC 728 arose following the liquidation of Cryptopia,. Click here for further analysis by Stace Hammond of Ruscoe & Moore v Cryptopia Limited 2020 (in liquidation) [2020] NZHC 728, in which the New Zealand High Court found cryptocurrency to be 'property', and not 'currency'. About the Author. Andrew Comer Partner. I am a Partner in the Corporate / Commercial team at Stace Hammond

This judgment follows cases in other common law jurisdictions reaching similar conclusions from New Zealand (Ruscoe & Moore v Cryptopia Ltd [CIV-2019-409-000544] [2020] NZHC 728) and Singapore (Quoine Pte Ltd v B2C2 [2020 SGCA (I) 02)] Court-appointed counsel for the unsecured creditors in Ruscoe v Cryptopia Limited (in liquidation) [2020] NZHC 728, an application for directions by the liquidators of a cryptocurrency exchange raising novel issues of property, trust, and insolvency law in relation to cryptocurrencies.; Counsel for Woolworths in a successful application for judicial review of a decision by the Alcohol. B2C2 Ltd v Quoine Pte Ltd [2020] SGCA(I) 2 (a Singapore case) Ruscoe and Moore v. Cryptopia Limited (in liquidation) [2020] NZHC 728 (a New Zealand case) Cryptopia was a New Zealand-based cryptocurrency ex-change that provided an online platform or exchange t Thankfully, the New Zealand High Court in David Ian Ruscoe & Malcolm Russell Moore v Cryptopia Limited (in liquidation) [2020] NZHC 718 (Cryptopia), which deals directly with this issue. Brief Facts. Cryptopia is a cryptocurrency exchange online platform The recent High Court of New Zealand decision of David Ian Ruscoe And Malcolm Russell Moore v Cryptopia Limited (in liquidation) [2020] NZHC 728 (8 April 2020) considered the very much unchartered waters of the legal standing of cryptocurrencies as property

High Court recognizes property in cryptocurrency - Lexolog

Growing Body of Common Law Decisions That Cryptocurrencies

Ruscoe v Cryptopia Limited (in liquidation) [2020] NZHC 728 (New Zealand) About the Author Kamala Richardson is an associate in the firm's Private Client & Wealth Management practice group and specializes in wills, estate planning and matters related to trust law, foundations and company law 6 Ruscoe v Cryptopia Limited (in liquidation) [2020] NZHC 728, paragraphs 120 to 121, 133. 7 National Provincial Bank Ltd v Ainsworth [1965] AC 1175 (HL) at 1247-1248 In New Zealand earlier this year, the question was considered in Ruscoe v Cryptopia Limited (in liquidation) CIV-2019-409-000544 [2020] NZHC 728. This case involved what is widely regarded as the biggest single theft in New Zealand's history. Cryptopia was a cryptocurrency exchange In Ruscoe v Cryptopia Ltd (in Liquidation) [2020] NZHC 728 l'Alta Corte della Nuova Zelanda ha dichiarato che le criptovalute, in quanto risorse digitali, sono una forma di proprietà che può essere detenuta in via fiduciaria.. La Sentenza conferma la scelta interpretativa gia' effettuata dagli Stati Uniti, Inghilterra, ed ora nuova zelanda.. 1. Perche' la decisione e' important

What To Do If A Cryptocurrency Business Goes Bust - Stace

Internationally, the High Court of New Zealand has recently released its landmark ruling in Ruscoe v Cryptopia Limited (in liquidation) CIV-2019-409-000544 [2020] NZHC 728, which referenced the UK legal statement and AA v Persons Unknown in determining that cryptocurrency was 'property' and capable of being held on trust The judgments of the English High Court in AA v Persons Unknown and the New Zealand High Court in Ruscoe and Another v Cryptopia Ltd in Liquidation represent an important step in that direction. If other jurisdictions follow suit, cyber criminals may find it increasingly difficult to avoid the long arm of the law, as it reaches deeper into cyberspace Akshaya Kamalnath, The ANU College of Law The facts of Ruscoe and Moore v Cryptopia Limited (In Liquidation) [2020] NZHC 728 might not be as racy as those of Quadriga, but nevertheless gave rise to n This text originally appeared in LawNews (ADLS) and is right here with permission. By James Cochrane, Arran Hunt & The liquidators were tasked with determining who had an interest in the remaining cryptocurrencies and what the nature of their interests were. Earlier this year, in Ruscoe v Cryptopia [2020] NZHC 728, the New Zealand High Court held that cryptocurrency was a species of property and, that in the circumstances, the cryptocurrencies were held on trust for the accountholders

Thankfully, the New Zealand High Court in David Ian Ruscoe & Malcolm Russell Moore v Cryptopia Limited (in liquidation) [2020] NZHC 718 (Cryptopia), which deals directly with this issue. Brief Facts Cryptopia is a cryptocurrency exchange online platform In Ruscoe v Cryptopia LTD (In Liquidation) (Cryptopia) [2020] NZHC 728, the High Court of New Zealand held that cryptoassets are objects of property which can be held on trust. This seminar explores the wider implications of these decisions for property and contract law, and considers how the principles laid down in Quoine and Cryptopia may influence future cryptoasset-related disputes

Cryptocurrency as Property: Ruscoe v Cryptopia Ltd (in liq

Acting for the liquidators of Cryptopia (in liquidation) involving novel legal issues concerning the status of cryptocurrency at law, and the insolvency of corporate trustee companies (Ruscoe v Cryptopia Ltd (in liquidation) [2020] NZHC 728 In line with the UKJT's legal statement, the Court determined that while it was difficult to formulate a precise definition, cryptoassets could be treated as property for the purposes of the New Zealand Companies' Act and probably more generally (Ruscoe v Cryptopia Limited (in liquidation) [2020] NZHC 728, paragraphs 120 to 121, 133) Other recent decisions on this issue include B2C2 Ltd v Quoine PTC Ltd [2019] SGHC (I) 03; Ruscoe v Cryptopia Ltd (In Liquidation) [2020] NZHC 728; Vorotyntseva v Money-4 Ltd t/a Nebeus.com [2018] EWHC 2596 (Ch); Liam David Robertson v Persons Unknown (15 July 2019) CL-2019-000444, Unreported Over 80 attendees from Singapore and overseas logged on to join this insightful session which discussed two recent judgments, Quoine Pte Ltd v B2C2 Ltd [2020] SGCA(I) 2 (a decision of the Singapore Court of Appeal) and Ruscoe v Cryptopia LTD (In Liquidation) [2020] NZHC 728 (a decision of the New Zealand High Court)

Acting for liquidators in an application to the High Court for directions under the Companies Act 1993 on novel issues involving cryptocurrency ( Ruscoe v Cryptopia Ltd (in liq) [2020] NZHC 728) Assisting with a commercial disput Update 02 April 2021 for a review of the EC consultation on the issues see Matthias Lehmann here. Update 13 October 2020 for the New Zealand view holding that that a cryptocurrency constitutes property at common law and is therefore capable of being held on trust, see [2020] NZHC 728 Ruscoe v Cryptopia Limited (in Liquidation) an The relevance of these issues to insolvency practitioners is evidenced by the recent decision of the New Zealand High Court in Ruscoe and Moore v Cryptopia Limited (in liquidation) [2020] NZHC 728. Show more Show les

The Law of Cryptoassets is the Law of the Hors

2 See Vorotynseva v Money-4-Limited t/a Nebeus.Com [2018] EWHC 2596; Robertson v Persons Unknown (Unreported, 15 July 2019, Moulder J); AA v Persons Unknown who demanded Bitcoin on 10 th and 11 th October 2019 [2020] 4 WLR 35 (proprietary injunction granted); Quoine Pte Ltd v B2C2 Ltd [2020] SGCA(I) 2; Ruscoe v Cryptopia Ltd (in liquidation) [2020] NZHC 728 Maddie appeared for the liquidators in their application to the High Court on novel issues relating to digital property and cryptocurrency in Ruscoe v Cryptopia Limited (in liquidation) [2020] NZHC 728 In Ruscoe v Cryptopia Ltd (in Liquidation) [2020] NZHC 728 the New Zealand High Court held that cryptocurrencies, as digital assets, are a form of property that are capable of being held on trust. Cryptocurrencies are property capable of being held on trust New Zealand High Court holds A New Zealand High Court has affirmed that cryptocurrencies are property, and can be treated as such, as cryptocurrency held by exchange Cryptopia Ltd became the subject of a dispute following the exchange's liquidation (see Ruscoe v Cryptopia Limited (in liquidation) CIV-2019-409-000544 [2020] NZHC 728).. This bolsters the findings in the UK Jurisdiction Taskforce's Legal Statement on.

Paper Title: Cryptocurrencies as Property: Ruscoe and Moore v Cryptopia Limited (In Liquidation) [2020] NZHC 728. Summary: This note outlines the approach taken to 'the property question'. Authors: Paul Babie*, David Brown*, Ryan Catterwell†, and Mark Giancaspro Ruscoe v Cryptopia Limited (in liquidation) [2020] NZHC 728 (8 April 2020) Read case. Central banking / financial markets / monetary policy. The rise of cryptocurrency also raises issues for central bank regulation. The Reserve Bank reported in May that people were holding more cash during the Covid-19 lockdowns In Ruscoe v Cryptopia Ltd (in Liquidation) [2020] NZHC 728 the New Zealand High Court held that cryptocurrencies, as digital assets, are a form of property that are capable of being held on trust. About. Inside Tech Law is our global technology resource and blog. Stay connected Ruscoe v Cryptopia Ltd (in Liquidation) [2020] NZHC 728 - cryptocurrencies, as digital assets, are a form of property that are capable of being held on trust News Fri May 08 2020

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